Breakfast Dessert Lunch/Dinner Recipes

Palačinke – Serbian Pancake Recipe

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

Palačinke – Serbian Pancake Recipe

In Serbia we eat palačinke (pa-la-cheen-keh), a.k.a. crepes, for any meal. I don’t even mean savory crepes… I’ve had Nutella-filled palačinke at my cousins’ home for dinner on many occasions.

Palačinke are very simple to make once you’ve got the technique down. My grandma has been making them for years and is quite the expert. Although she can tell when to stop adding ingredients to the batter just by  its consistency, I have not yet acquired this connoisseurship, and must follow a recipe.

Ingredients

This recipe is adapted from All Recipes’ Basic Crepes recipe. Although the recipe isn’t mine, I’m giving you original, insider tips on how to perfect your crepe-making technique. To make 8 crepes, you will need:

  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted

I must note that my grandma, however, uses only eggs, milk and flour for her crepes. I haven’t tried using those three recipes in the ratios given in this recipe, but just know that if you don’t have butter or salt, it’s not the end of the world.

As a general rule of thumb, a 1-egg recipe (halve all of the ingredients) is usually enough for two people.


serbian food guideIf you’re enjoying this recipe, you’ll love our Serbian Food Guide ———>


Instructions

All you need to do is mix all of the above ingredients until you have a consistent, homogeneous batter. Make sure to break apart any granules, for a smooth consistency.

To cook your crepes, you can use any frying pan. I, however, bought myself a crepe pan (it’s very flat, thin and shallow) to encourage myself to cook these more often. I don’t think it actually makes a difference what kind of pan you use. You can grease the pan with oil, but I prefer melting some butter to give it a crispier texture.

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

Grease your pan!

The difference between crepes and pancakes are mainly the thickness. Pouring the perfect amount of batter onto your pan when making crepes is an art form that takes time and patience. Your first few crepes will probably end up much thicker than you want them, but I promise you will be a pro by the end of your batter.

Part of getting the right amount of batter onto the pan is in how you transport the batter. After trying many methods, I recommend pouring the batter into a measuring cup with a pouring edge and then just pouring the batter onto the pan.

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

Pour the batter into a measuring cup for easy pouring onto the pan

Once the pan is hot, pour less batter than you think you will need. Then, just as soon as you pour it, swirl the wrist the you’re holding the pan with to spread the batter, ideally covering the whole pan with a very thin layer. Wait until it seems like the crepe is ready to flip. You can verify this by trying to lift a corner of the crepe off the pan with knife. If it sticks, give it a few more seconds. Keep in mind that the crepes will cook faster the longer you use the pan because it’s getting increasingly hotter. The crepe should only need a few seconds of cooking once its been cooked. You want the crepe to be a golden color. Don’t burn it, and don’t under cook it!

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

This crepe needs a bit more cooking on the top side.

When it comes to filling your crepes, you can really fill them with whatever you want. I tend to use Nutella and fresh fruit, like strawberries, blueberries and/or bananas. In Serbia, a favorite topping with the Nutella is ground Plazma Keks, which is basically like graham cracker crumbs. I’ve also had my crepes with ice cream, so the combinations are really endless. Below are some filling combos I recommend. For more inspiration, check out Crepeaway’s menu.

  • Nutella with strawberries, blueberries and bananas

  • Nutella with graham cracker crumbs

  • melted butter and sugar

  • ground walnuts and sugar (a simple, Serbian classic)

  • your favorite kind of jam with ground walnuts

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

Mascarpone, hazelnut spread and strawberries

Traditionally, I use all my batter and stack all of my crepes on a plate until I’m ready to fill them. When cooking for this post, however, I experimented with filling the crepes directly on the pan, because I like the texture of melted Nutella.

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

Spreading Nutella and mascarpone cheese onto a hot crepe

I also experimented with using mascarpone cheese with my Nutella, because I had some on hand. Mascarpone claims it’s cheese, but it’s more like sweet butter. After flipping the crepe once, I dropped a spoonful of Nutella and a spoonful of mascarpone onto it. With the stove still on, I let the heat melt the toppings, and then I spread them evenly with my spatula. I added strawberries once I had removed the crepes from the pan. The mascarpone gave the Nutella a creamier taste.


serbian food guide<——-Want to learn about more Balkan sweets? Click here to check out our Serbian Food Guide.


When it comes to folding your crepe, there are many options as well. Usually if I have tons of bulging toppings, I just fold in both sides to the middle and consume the crepe with a fork and knife. With less bulky toppings, I either roll up the crepe into a cigarette shape and eat it with my hands, or I’ll fold the crepe in half twice and use utensils.

Palacinke - Serbian Pancake Recipe via BetterThanRamen.net

Folding method #1

Once you get the hang of it, making crepes is really simple. The crepe itself is a very versatile medium that can be used for savory and sweet eats.

Palacinke - Serbian Pancakes
Serves 4
Palacinke, or Serbian pancakes or crepes, are perfect any time of day. Serve them with Nutella and fruit for a sweet breakfast or with ham and cheese for a savory dinner.
Write a review
Print
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
15 min
Total Time
20 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 cup flour
  2. 2 eggs
  3. 1/2 cup milk
  4. 1/2 cup water
  5. 1/4 teaspoon salt
  6. 2 tablespoons butter, melted
Instructions
  1. Mix all of the above ingredients until you have a consistent, homogeneous batter. Make sure to break apart any granules, for a smooth consistency.
  2. Grease a crepe pan (or regular frying pan) with oil or melted butter.
  3. Pour some batter onto the pan when the pan is hot. I recommend putting your batter into a measuring cup because the spout makes it easier to pour the batter onto the pan. Pouring the perfect amount of batter onto your pan when making crepes is an art form that takes time and patience. Your first few crepes will probably end up much thicker than you want them, but I promise you will be a pro by the end of your batter.
  4. Once the pan is hot, pour less batter than you think you will need. Then, just as soon as you pour it, swirl the wrist the you're holding the pan with to spread the batter, ideally covering the whole pan with a very thin layer.
  5. Wait until it seems like the crepe is ready to flip. You can verify this by trying to lift a corner of the crepe off the pan with knife. If it sticks, give it a few more seconds. Keep in mind that the crepes will cook faster the longer you use the pan because it's getting increasingly hotter. The crepe should only need a few seconds of cooking once its been cooked. You want the crepe to be a golden color. Don't burn it, and don't under cook it!
Notes
  1. When it comes to filling your crepes, you can really fill them with whatever you want. I tend to use Nutella and fresh fruit, like strawberries, blueberries and/or bananas. In Serbia, Plazma Keks (similar to ground graham crackers) is a favorite topping alongside Nutella. I've also had my crepes with ice cream, so the combinations are really endless. Below are some filling combos I recommend
  2. -Nutella with strawberries, blueberries and bananas
  3. -Nutella with graham cracker crumbs
  4. -Melted butter and sugar
  5. -Ground walnuts and sugar (a simple, Serbian classic)
  6. -Your favorite jam with ground walnuts
  7. When it comes to folding your crepe, there are many options as well. Usually if I have tons of bulging toppings, I just fold in both sides to the middle and consume the crepe with a fork and knife. With less bulky toppings, I either roll up the crepe into a cigarette shape and eat it with my hands, or I'll fold the crepe in half twice and use utensils.
Adapted from All Recipes
Adapted from All Recipes
Better Than Ramen http://betterthanramen.net/

Can’t get enough crepes? Click the links below to get to my other posts about places that serve crepes!

  • Crepes Parfait – a food truck that serves traditional French sweet and savory crepes in DC

  • Le Beau Monde – a delicious Philadelphia creperie

  • Corner Cafe – a diner in my hometown that offers cannoli crepes as one of its specials

  • Bread & Chocolate – a DMV franchise serving a few pfannkuchen (German crepes) options

palacinke serbian pancake recipe


Like what you read?

Click here to check out our Serbian Food Guide!

serbian food guide

 

You're gonna love these other posts!

No Comments

  • Reply sierramargaret

    I love this! Now I want some crepes 😀

    November 5, 2013 at 9:11 PM
    • Ana Cvetkovic
      Reply madasrabbits45

      Thanks 🙂 Now you know how to make them! We could have them at the next ESA breakfast!

      November 5, 2013 at 9:47 PM

    Leave a Reply

    Food Advertising by
    logo